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As part of a local history project I want to produce a series of maps illustrating the, street by street, development of my village from its foundation in 1805 to the present day, which can be printed and potentially used in a future publication on the subject. Can I use OSM for this purpose?

asked 04 Oct '11, 23:16

Ian%20Duncan's gravatar image

Ian Duncan
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Thank you for your guidance. I certainly don't want to do anything to adversely affect the existing map of my village on OSM. The suggestion to export OSM software seems too complicated for my level of IT skill, so may be more feasible to export the map from OSM and work on it offline. However, just wanted to check first if it is possible to edit the map online and export it without saving it first?

(07 Oct '11, 17:33) Ian Duncan
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If you edit the map online using Potlatch 2 (which is what the happens by default when you click "edit") then any changes that you make will overwrite the main map whenever you click "save" (and it isn't easy to "save locally").

However, JOSM, which EdLoach mentions below, is an off-line editor, and you can save the results of your editing locally without uploading it, and use something like Maperitive to create a map from that locally saved data.

(07 Oct '11, 19:24) SomeoneElse ♦

You can use OSM for how the village is today, but not so much about how it was before.

See also Gnonthgol's answer to Does OSM use any historic data? or want to?

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answered 05 Oct '11, 07:28

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Jonas_
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As Jonas_ says, the main OSM database is really for mapping things as they are.

You could however use some of the OSM software that is available to produce older maps if you wanted. In theory you could set yourself up with a whole copy of the software stack which stores the main database, and the database used by Mapnik for rendering. This might be a lot of work and can be tricky to do for a beginner.

Perhaps simpler would be to use JOSM to draw your maps, then save your work as a .osm file WITHOUT uploading it, and use something like Maperitive to render a map from the .osm file.

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answered 05 Oct '11, 09:40

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EdLoach ♦
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You are free to use and copy openstreetmap so you could within a paint program delete it back in time in stages,If you know them,saving these backward developments. If you search the wiki you should find some out of copyright maps which may help. but please don't delete us back to 1805. good luck!

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answered 05 Oct '11, 13:20

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andy mackey
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edited 05 Oct '11, 13:47

As EdLoach said, in principle you could use the standard OSM editor to progressively delete streets, getting backwards in time and having screencopies or exports at each step.

Anyways, I definitely recommend not to do this before having got some practice (what about improving your village map? I'm sure there are some details missing: stairs in the old town, streetnames missing...) because otherwise there is a HUGE risk that you inadvertently save your work (of progressive destruction), which would be a real pain here indeed.

So, sincerely, just don't consider doing this until you have indeed some experience with the editor (at least you'll have understood adding new streets is difficult ;-)

Hervé

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answered 05 Oct '11, 14:54

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Herve5
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edited 05 Oct '11, 14:55

Thank you for your guidance. I certainly don't want to do anything to adversely affect the existing map of my village on OSM. Exporting OSM software seems very complicated for my level of skill, so may be better to export the map and work on it offline. However, is it possible to edit the map online and export the edited map without saving it first?

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answered 07 Oct '11, 17:29

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Ian Duncan
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Ian, if you want to stay with online editing I fear it's not possible to both edit then locally save the changes. Online, you can edit, you can save locally the existing map, but not changes you just made. This comes basically from the way tabs are working in the editor: you have one tab for viewing, one for editing, one for exporting.

Now, as you can save the original map locally, you could very well reopen this local map with one of the local editors, change it at will (e. g. by progressively substracting streets to get back in time?) and save these successive states.

Also, remember if the issue is only to start from the present state then suppress some streets, you could easily perform this with any vectorial graphic editor starting from e. g. an export to svg format --but this will work only for street suppression, not full edition.

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answered 07 Oct '11, 18:15

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Herve5
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accept rate: 13%

I am working on a larger scale of this, developing a set of "snapshots" of the whole of Devon intended to stretch back as far as I can find data for, but particularly focused on the period from 1600 to 1840, when my ancestors lived in the town of Moretonhampstead.

So far I have used data from planet.OSM, OS OpenData, OS historical maps, Madgery's roman roads, Lewis's 1840 map and a few others I have found online. I hope to obtain as many tithe maps as I can (being a pensioner cost is a substantial issue).

I'm using a Linux machine for the bulk of the work. postgis database for storage, osmosis for importing OSM data, Qgis for data picking, format conversions and georeferencing, Mapinfo for editing and merging.

postgis http://postgis.refractions.net/ , osmosis http://dev.openstreetmap.org/~bretth/osmosis-build/osmosis-latest.zip & qgis http://www.qgis.org/wiki/Download are available for windows, mac & linux MapInfo is a windows program that I am able to run in windows emulation on linux.

qgis could replace mapinfo but I prefer its editing.

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answered 10 Oct '11, 05:50

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sparrowhawk
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question asked: 04 Oct '11, 23:16

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last updated: 10 Oct '11, 05:50

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