I thought at one time it was possible to overlay UK local authority boundaries on the map? I don't seem to be able to do this, is it still possible? Thanks.

asked 14 Dec '18, 10:35

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SLOCAL
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Which map are you asking about?

(14 Dec '18, 10:40) SomeoneElse ♦

Sorry don't understand what you mean.

(14 Dec '18, 11:06) SLOCAL

You talk about "the map" above. Many, many different maps use OSM data. Which is "the map" to which you are referring? Is it a web based map and if so what is the URL? Is it on a mobile device of some sort? Is it on a cake?

(14 Dec '18, 11:23) SomeoneElse ♦

I thought I was on opensreetmap.org?

https://www.openstreetmap.org/#map=13/50.9056/-0.4442

There really is no need to be rude and sarcastic.

(14 Dec '18, 11:49) SLOCAL
3

I am not being rude - I'm trying to find out what your problem is. I could have answered "no", which would have been a factually correct but unhelpful answer. You are assuming things about the OpenStreetMap project that aren't true - it is more than a website. In fact even at https://www.openstreetmap.org/#map=13/50.9056/-0.4442 there are 4 different available map styles.

If there ever has been an explicit overlay for LA boundaries on any of those 4 map styles it will have been a very long time ago (> 5 years). However, OSM boundary data (some of which is ultimately derived from LA boundary data) is available. https://www.openstreetmap.org/way/222193410#map=15/50.9246/-0.4010 in your link is an example of this.

Perhaps you could expand your question using more words to explain exactly what you're trying to do and what problem you are trying to solve and people may be able to help you.

(14 Dec '18, 12:17) SomeoneElse ♦

Personally I think adding a link to a photo of a cake when I am asking a question is pretty sarcastic and rude at worst, at best irritating and unhelpful.

It may well be more than a website but, to a lay user such as myself, it is just that - a website. I am not "assuming" anything, true or not.

I am not really sure how much simpler I can explain it. I want to look at a map which shows local authority boundaries. I know I have seen it on the openstreetmap - possibly five years ago, I thought it was less. There was the facility to turn the boundaries on and off, on the right hand menu under the "layers" icon.

You say

" OSM boundary data (some of which is ultimately derived from LA boundary data) is available. https://www.openstreetmap.org/way/222193410#map=15/50.9246/-0.4010 in your link is an example of this."

That looked like a good start but drew me one line which disappeared when I zoomed out. Perhaps I am missing something there about how it works?

(14 Dec '18, 14:08) SLOCAL
2

On https://www.openstreetmap.org it is not and never has been possible to switch boundaries on and off. You can check if any of the other layers offers a better style for your use case. Alternatively check any other OSM-based map.

(14 Dec '18, 14:28) scai ♦
showing 5 of 7 show 2 more comments

To answer the question, and take into account the comments made...

"On the map" is not clear, as OpenStreetMap is a database that gets used by many people to generate maps on different websites, apps, and yes even on cakes.

The defacto main people see the data is through the maps on openstreetmap.org. However this has never had the ability to show and hide local authority boundaries as an overlay. You can click the "layers" icon on the right for 4 different styles, but each one is static and without overlays. You might be thinking of the Default layer when the style had the boundaries more prominent (but could not be toggled by the user).

I'm struggling to think what other website might have had this as an overlay. There is OpenStreetBrowser that has many controllable overlays on the left-hand side. It includes (under Places) and "Administrative" layer. This is really slow, you have to zoom in to get county boundaries, and it returns some false-positives such as rivers or sections of the boundaries.

@scai also shared the list of OSM-based maps. It's not comprehensive, but you might find there the website you were remembering.

permanent link

answered 14 Dec '18, 19:13

LivingWithDragons's gravatar image

LivingWithDr...
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accept rate: 5%

"On the map" was very clear bearing in mind that I am looking on this very page at the help pages for Open Street Maps which was linked from openstreetmap.org which is a website with a map on it.

The "cake" remark was flippant, at best. There was no need for it. If you are posting on a help website - and I have no idea who either of you are - then be that - helpful. Not smug, condescending and juvenile.

With regard to the actual query, it seems it must have been a different site then, I know the appearance was very similar to OpenStreetMap. I will look through the list you have provided thank you.

(16 Dec '18, 13:19) SLOCAL
2

The "cake" remark was flippant, at best

Actually, it really wasn't. The whole point of the OpenStreetMap project is that it's possible to do what you like with the data, even bake a cake based on it. It is, if you like, a way of pointing out the openness of OSM compared to non-open other maps - that even something so ridiculous that a geo data provider would never consider, like providing a design for a cake, was allowed.

I am looking on this very page at the help pages for Open Street Maps which was linked from openstreetmap.org which is a website with a map on it.

As I'm already mentioned there are 4 different map styles osm.org's front page, not one. Also, all of the maps that have been mentioned so far are actually indirectly linked from there (yes, even the cake). We get many questions here about some small aspect of OSM where it's the only part that the question asker knows about and it's not obvious to anyone else what part it is (for example, maps for garman devices, the "design your own map" umap service, use of OSM data in R, etc. etc.). The only way to find out what the question is really about is to ask.

(16 Dec '18, 13:42) SomeoneElse ♦
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question asked: 14 Dec '18, 10:35

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last updated: 16 Dec '18, 13:43

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