What’s the best definition for this kind of barrier fence or wall. Its function is keeping sheep in a certain meadow and by lack of barbed wire farmers used all they could get free in the fields. Fences were made out of wood (logs), growing plants and hedge laying or collecting all the rocks from the field to build a stone wall, this one called Tuunwal is build out of sod just earned form the fields. Or should I make an addition to the appropriate pages, but after a remark on its definition as fence or wall versus retaining wall ?

asked 11 Oct '16, 12:09

Hendrikklaas's gravatar image

Hendrikklaas
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A picture would be really useful here... https://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tuunwal shows a couple of examples, but what's characteristic about it - the "bank and ditch", just the bank or just the ditch?

(11 Oct '16, 12:17) SomeoneElse ♦
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Hi, the bank is the actual barrier or separator; the "ditch" you’re referring to is the place of the used sods, now a bank of several layers on top of each other. The second picture is the bank after some time; the banks carry due to the conditions a special kind of growth. Thats why I hesitate to call it a fench, it has the looks of a stone wall.

(11 Oct '16, 17:15) Hendrikklaas

This type of barrier has unique characteristics in construction and style so I think that to be really accurate a new tag value should be used - 'barrier=tuunwal'. The bank & ditch form a single feature that just doesn't fit with any of the existing 'barrier' tags.

I wouldn't use 'barrier=retaining_wall'. To me that implies that rock or soil is being held back by the wall http://wiki.openstreetmap.org/wiki/Tag:barrier%3Dretaining_wall

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answered 11 Oct '16, 22:03

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NZGraham
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I have seen something very similar to this type of barrier in the UK. They are very old so it is difficult to know whether, when they were first made, there would have been a ditch. Some are just made of earth, others also have a "dry stone" facing. Search on Cloddiau for this type. Many of these are in a poor state of repair so they are just a mixture of earth and stone. If they are still in use as barriers for animals then often there will now be a barbed wire fence on top. Where I've seen them isn't a good area for trees or a hedge to grow.

I decided to tag them "barrier=wall" & "wall=stone_bank". If there are just earth then I guess you could use "wall=earth_bank" I thought using "wall=bank" and then "material=*" would be confusing given the more common use of the work "bank". It also seemed reasonable to have them as a type of wall rather than another type of barrier.

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answered 12 Oct '16, 19:39

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dud1
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reverted 12 Oct '16, 19:41

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question asked: 11 Oct '16, 12:09

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last updated: 12 Oct '16, 19:41

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