The link below points is a case where the neighborhood limit (administrative) coincides with a transmission line.

http://www.openstreetmap.org/edit#map=20/-20.53192/-54.61887

Can I use part of this line (including in relation to the neighborhood) as a limit?

Doubt is the fact that the transmission line be air and the limit neighborhood, though imaginary, earthly being (one is on top and the other is down).

See which already has a line on site, which is part of the relationship between neighborhoods and is correct because it is two-way street, with flower bed in the middle.

If possible, can I delete the line, getting the map "cleaner" (Concept Lean / Kaizen).

Another question - within the same subject - is if I can use part of a area (cutting her off) as neighborhood boundary in a relationship. I did it but when rendeirizado in the browser area is strange, sounding line.

asked 11 Dec '15, 00:45

seth's gravatar image

seth
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If the (legal) definition of the boundary is the powerline, then I would include it in the relation. If it just happens to be coincident, then I'd draw a separate way for the boundary line. Same with the area you mentioned.

Since the map uses an overhead view, I don't think the fact that the powerline is in the air not on the ground is a big deal. Plus, usually boundaries include a certain amount of airspace above the land.

BTW, you can tag the boundary-only lines as boundary=administrative.

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answered 11 Dec '15, 14:39

neuhausr's gravatar image

neuhausr
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accept rate: 20%

edited 11 Dec '15, 14:41

@neuhausr, thanks for your answer.

(11 Dec '15, 22:19) seth

I would draw 2 ways, one for the boundary, one for the transmission line, just next to one another. Or you could draw them over each other and let them share nodes (which makes it a bit harder to edit afterwards). Problem with this is, is that nodes on a transmission line need to have a power-tag. So you cannot add additional nodes for smoothness. Of course, overlapping ways have a different meaning from ways that are just next to each other. Is the neighborhood border really coinciding with the transmission line ?

Please do not delete the transmission line, this is correct data (I assume). Let the renderers decide to show the line or not. In case you use JOSM for editing, you can always apply a filter to hide either the border or the transmission line, depending on what you are working on.

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answered 11 Dec '15, 07:45

escada's gravatar image

escada
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accept rate: 21%

1

There is a parallel line tool in the Potlatch2 toolbox that is ideal for this. JOSM seems to have a parallel tool as well. I could not find one in iD

(11 Dec '15, 08:09) andy mackey

Ok. The limit goes exactly where the transmission line. But my intention is just the opposite, ie using the transmission line as a limit and exclude the other line. But the question is whether it is semantically correct because the transmission line is air, and the limit is land (even if imaginary).

(11 Dec '15, 10:25) seth
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question asked: 11 Dec '15, 00:45

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last updated: 11 Dec '15, 22:34

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