How do you tag privately owned public spaces (POPS) like those in New York?

For more information about these please see:

http://www.nyc.gov/html/dcp/html/priv/priv.shtml

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Privately_owned_public_space

These POPS can be indoors and outdoors.

Maybe you could comment on the access tags and the functional tags.

asked 10 Nov '15, 17:12

ALE's gravatar image

ALE
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edited 10 Nov '15, 21:24


You could add the owner (using owner=whoever) and ownership=private. The rest of the tags would just follow the functional use of the space.

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answered 10 Nov '15, 17:30

maxerickson's gravatar image

maxerickson
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edited 10 Nov '15, 17:31

Hi consider using access=permissive.

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answered 10 Nov '15, 17:29

Hendrikklaas's gravatar image

Hendrikklaas
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edited 10 Nov '15, 17:46

SomeoneElse's gravatar image

SomeoneElse ♦
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In the US, for spaces like the one described by the wikipedia link in the question, it's unlikely the permission to use the space can be revoked by the owner (it would be done by some public planning commission).

In general I think the meaning of access=permissive is being bent quite a ways when it is used in the US at all (lots of private access is treated as public, but it's often the case than an individual can be asked to leave for arbitrary reasons).

(edited to clarify geographic scope of my comment)

(10 Nov '15, 17:37) maxerickson

For privately-owned public spaces in the UK, "permissive" (or even "private") would be the more likely - I'd expect that the owner does have the right to revoke access. As an aside, see this recent article discussing the issues with one particular project:

http://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2015/nov/06/garden-bridge-mobile-phone-signals-tracking-london

Obviously the Guardian has a far from neutral POV here, but the links from there such as http://planning-docs.lambeth.gov.uk/AnitePublicDocs/00590159.pdf are valid.

One more thing - rather than "access" consider those modes that can actually use the space (foot, possibly bicycle, possibly others). Just "access=permissive" implies all modes have the same access, which is unlikely.

(10 Nov '15, 17:51) SomeoneElse ♦
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I had answered in the context of the wikipedia article linked in the question which talks about zoning. I clarified that I wasn't talking about everywhere.

(10 Nov '15, 17:56) maxerickson
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Could you also say something about how to tag the function? Would tag it as a park, although these POPS are usually rather small?

(10 Nov '15, 21:22) ALE
1

As maxerickson said in the other answer, "The rest of the tags would just follow the functional use of the space.".

If something "looks like a park" tag it as a park; if it looks like a highway=pedestrian, tag it as that.

(10 Nov '15, 21:29) SomeoneElse ♦

I am usually a little bit reluctant to tag something as a park if it is only something like 15 x 15 m large and has not much vegetation. But many of those POPS have a couple of trees and a couple of benches. Not very often do they have also some grass surfaces. So how do you tag that?

(10 Nov '15, 21:32) ALE

I've tagged many small parks, but they usually had green space. Another option is highway=pedestrian, area=yes. This is often used for squares and plazas, which seems closer to what you're talking about.

(12 Nov '15, 15:15) neuhausr
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question asked: 10 Nov '15, 17:12

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last updated: 12 Nov '15, 15:15

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