I once mapped a traffic choker such as the one shown below as three ways one for the main part of the highway and two highway=cycleway.

Given the topology of such features, mapping them this way is inaccurate (the cycleways flare away from their true line). In my mapped example there is also a pedestrian crossing on a road table in the middle of the chicane. So they can be somewhat complex.

Is there any quicker/simpler way of mapping such detail, without losing the information from the 3-way approach?

choker with two cycle 'gutters'

asked 09 Jun '13, 06:18

SK53's gravatar image

SK53 ♦
24.3k46244383
accept rate: 20%

edited 09 Jun '13, 15:06


I would not split a road into multiple ways for such a small section. This is actually quite similar to any other highway=crossing + crossing=island - and these are also just a single node in the way despite the (extremely short) physical separation. The only additional feature here is the unusual distribution/bundling of the lanes.

permanent link

answered 09 Jun '13, 10:51

Tordanik's gravatar image

Tordanik
11.1k1395138
accept rate: 33%

The fact that there are crossings is imo immaterial as to how the road lane infrastructure is mapped, and not the question I asked.

I see a hint in your answer that use of relevant lane tags might avoid the need for a 3-way solution.

(09 Jun '13, 14:31) SK53 ♦
1

Chokers like this, but without the pedestrian crossing, are quite common around where I live. I always map them as a single point in the road with the tag traffic_calming=choker. They are a choker for both cars and for cyclists. (They are at least with the amount of cyclists and mopeds on the road in The Netherlands.)

Adding the crossing tags to the same node isn't a problem, as all the tags have a different key.

(09 Jun '13, 14:38) cartinus

I'd like to see a photo, but this isn't a choker for cyclists, the whole point of the 'gutters' is not to penalise cyclists at the choker. Whether it works as such is a different matter.

(09 Jun '13, 14:49) SK53 ♦

Whether it works as such is a different matter.

No it's not. All good intentions by people never riding a bike are moot, when the net effect is something completely different for people who actually do ride a bike.

  1. Look at your own picture. Imagine a country where people drive on the right side of the road and the car is parked closer to the choker. Oncoming cars move to the middle of the road way before they reach the choker. Now a cyclist has to wait before he can pass the parked car.
  2. You can't pass slower cyclists at the choker itself and for some distance behind it for the same reason.
(09 Jun '13, 15:25) cartinus

In that example I would actually map it as three ways, because there are three ways separated by barriers. Someone using the crossing would have to negotiate 3 different streams of traffic. It looks funny on a map that maps wide roads as thin lines - a few people have had a go at mapping normal roads as areas, but not always with a great deal of success.

permanent link

answered 09 Jun '13, 10:44

SomeoneElse's gravatar image

SomeoneElse ♦
33.4k66348794
accept rate: 15%

This may help you as somone has a standard tag for them (near the bottom of the page) http://wiki.openstreetmap.org/wiki/Key:traffic_calming

I areaised a few recently here:- https://www.openstreetmap.org/way/368797281#map=19/51.74765/-1.22939&layers=D

I hope that helps

-Govanus

permanent link

answered 02 Nov '15, 20:39

Govanus's gravatar image

Govanus
1553711
accept rate: 3%

Your answer
toggle preview

Follow this question

By Email:

Once you sign in you will be able to subscribe for any updates here

By RSS:

Answers

Answers and Comments

Markdown Basics

  • *italic* or _italic_
  • **bold** or __bold__
  • link:[text](http://url.com/ "title")
  • image?![alt text](/path/img.jpg "title")
  • numbered list: 1. Foo 2. Bar
  • to add a line break simply add two spaces to where you would like the new line to be.
  • basic HTML tags are also supported

Question tags:

×10
×1
×1
×1

question asked: 09 Jun '13, 06:18

question was seen: 7,383 times

last updated: 02 Nov '15, 20:39

powered by OSQA