A topical question.A few months ago after a period of heavy rain I had to recce a walk to see if it was too flooded as I had arranged to lead a group walk along the river. I found the flood line site which yields good data but not heights above sea level, but if I could calibrate the low points on paths and some roads the gauge levels from the other site it would be very precise way of seeing what is passable. Any ideas of how these way heights on ways could be put in and used in OSM for checking against this other data http://www.environment-agency.gov.uk/homeandleisure/floods/riverlevels/default.aspx

asked 27 Nov '12, 16:24

andy%20mackey's gravatar image

andy mackey
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for example this car park is, I bet today (27 November 2012), under water and may well have a few flood wreaked cars in it. A smart phone using the river level data and, if we can add surface level it could save other cars in future.http://www.openstreetmap.org/?lat=52.32144&lon=-0.076936&zoom=18&layers=M

(27 Nov '12, 23:01) andy mackey

Topical again. If you are near a slowish river with locks I'm sure the river levels can be used to check the usability of some roads, paths and car parks.

(03 Feb '14, 23:46) andy mackey
(20 Jul '14, 12:01) andy mackey

OSM is not really relevant for what you ask. Which part of the land can be flooded depends on water level and land elevation but also on flood flow. Any dyke or wall or drain can change the water flow. What is more appropriate is a high detailed DEM (Digital elevation model) eventually combined with the 2D OSM data saying which feature is where.

A possible workaround for some small and localized feature can be the use of the tag "ele". But be aware about the datum when you compare different data sources elevations ('ele' is normally expressed in the WGS84 datum).

permanent link

answered 28 Nov '12, 14:06

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Pieren
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accept rate: 15%

Thanks for link and answer, I see your point but on the Great Ouse river between Bedford and the Fens it as a very slow gradient with locks and weirs. I think water levels on the roads, paths, parking areas and by buildings on the flood plain will track the river level gauges closely. I will plot some heights on my own route maps or way points for personal reference.

(28 Nov '12, 20:19) andy mackey

There is a new site that shows levels and for cyclists using, for example, the St Ives Cambridge busway route which as flooded they could calibrate depth which will track the river gauge. http://www.gaugemap.co.uk/

(20 Jul '14, 12:07) andy mackey
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question asked: 27 Nov '12, 16:24

question was seen: 1,278 times

last updated: 20 Jul '14, 12:07

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