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I am interested in knowing if OSM has a partnership or data stewardship scenario available.

The State of Wyoming (USA) does not possess a definitive GIS roads layer. Would OSM entertain the concept of a relationship similar to USGS's data stewardship scenario where an organization offers to maintain/update the state-owned roads for a large area while allowing private roads to be maintained through the standard crowd-sourcing model? The state would then want to mirror/distribute the open source data as well. Who would I contact to discuss this scenario?

Chris Arneson Wyoming GIS Technical Advisory Group

asked 27 Jun '12, 20:20

csarneson's gravatar image

csarneson
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As stated by Gnonthgol, anyone can edit OSM and reuse the data without needing permission. One thing to add to his response is that we are actually in the middle of changing our license. Right now it is still Creative Commons but we are moving towards releasing the OSM data set under the Open Database License. Hopefully this will be complete within a month or two. Also, to expand on a couple of points as it relates to governmental use:

You would not be the "owner" of any of the data any more than any other mapper who has contributed to OSM in Wyoming. So anyone else is still free to make edits to the state roads. There are ways of monitoring changes in an area so you could watch for it and take appropriate action which might involve acknowledging that your data is wrong and accepting the edit :)

Also, I don't know how Wyoming works but some governmental bodies are required to make their data available in the public domain. This unfortunately would not be possible with anything derived from OSM since our license requires attribution and share-alike.

But this is definitely an interesting idea and worth pursuing. I know something kind of similar has already happened in Portland. You can read a little about it here: https://github.com/openplans/OpenTripPlanner/wiki/Portland-Regional-Trip-Planner

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answered 27 Jun '12, 23:20

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ToeBee
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I've known for a while that the toughest part of this idea is the Dept of Transportation knowing that joe public could theoretically make edits to a state road line. That might be a tough sell which brought up the idea of having the state be the "data steward" meaning that they would be the authority on some types of features.

I don't believe the state needs to "own" the data so simply defining OSM as the state standard is my goal. Thank you both for your responses. I'm interested in the Portland example as well.

Chris

(27 Jun '12, 23:34) csarneson

The Finnish Gov (NLSF) is said to be considering to use OSM to monitor changes to data, which would prompt their own internal survey team to go verify the edit (that got them interested) and survey it themselves for the gov dataset. .. This is (said to) stem from the Open Geo Data move that Gov of Finland did this May.

As ToeBee points out the limitation (in this case) of OSM for you is the attribution + share-alike clauses in the license ... and as you say, that anyone can edit anything.

(08 Jul '12, 03:59) jaakkoh

Yes, an organization can maintain and update some roads for a large area if they wish to do so. And there is no need to contact anyone for this.

OpenStreetMap allows anyone to edit and use the map. It can be compared with the way wikipedia works. If you wish to contribute geodata you can do so. And if you want to use the geodata that is in OpenStreetMap you are free to do so without giving anything back or paying anything. The only caviot is that if you redistribute data derrived from the OSM database you have to give attribution and license it under CC BY-SA.

Of course we would like some donation for the server maintainence. And the local comunity would probably want to be contacted if you want to contribute large amounts of data.

If you want to contact someone from the comuity you can e-mail the mailing list at ( talk-us@openstreetmap.org ) or directly to a developer and contracter ( iandes@gmail.com ).

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answered 27 Jun '12, 20:54

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Gnonthgol ♦
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edited 27 Jun '12, 22:57

Chris,

Gnonthgol and ToeBee have done an excellent job covering the topic from a legal and practical perspective. I just wanted to add that I am engaged in a similar discussion with the State of Utah. I think it would be worthwhile to have some sort of platform to discuss this among more interested parties. I'm also in touch with some of the Portland folks. Drop me a line if you're interested.

Let me also point out that this would be a great session / panel topic for the State Of The Map conference in Portland in October.

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answered 05 Jul '12, 21:49

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mvexel
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question asked: 27 Jun '12, 20:20

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