It is fairly common for an administrative boundary to follow the course of a river. Should the river and the boundary be:

  1. The same way multiply tagged
  2. Overlapping ways

asked 18 Feb '12, 11:34

RobChafer's gravatar image

RobChafer
220111117
accept rate: 0%

edited 20 Feb '12, 13:40

srbrook's gravatar image

srbrook
99351225


The best solution is the first one.

If you have a river or something similar, you can add boundary=administartive or =postal_code or whatever you need.

On the first look, there is no sufficient information about this question in the OSM wiki about boundaries ... maybe we have to add some hints there.

permanent link

answered 18 Feb '12, 12:07

stephan75's gravatar image

stephan75
12.5k454209
accept rate: 6%

Thanks stephan75.

(18 Feb '12, 15:54) RobChafer

I would use first method and if editing in potlach2 the follow command "f" will after clicking a couple of nodes it will follow that way,which is great for long common boundaries see http://wiki.openstreetmap.org/wiki/Potlatch_2/Shortcuts

permanent link

answered 18 Feb '12, 20:08

andy%20mackey's gravatar image

andy mackey
11.9k76128263
accept rate: 4%

1

AFAIK boundaries are usually relations so if the boudary is defined to be the river, why not just add it as a multipolygon member.

(20 Feb '12, 11:42) LM_1

I suspect it depends:

Is the boundary defined as following the course of the river, or is it defined separately using a series of coordinates that happen to be where the river once was?

Where the boundary really does follow where the river is now, is it really in the middle of the river or on one bank of it?

How do you know where the boundary is with respect to the river, when boundaries often aren't marked on the ground?

permanent link

answered 20 Feb '12, 10:42

SomeoneElse's gravatar image

SomeoneElse ♦
32.8k64340769
accept rate: 16%

In the case I had on the map, the boundary followed the course of a small river. However there are lots of cases where the boundary roughly matches the river (probably because its way isn't very accurate).

(20 Feb '12, 10:52) RobChafer

I can see plenty of examples locally where rivers aren't where they used to be - either because they've naturally moved as time goes on, or they've been culverted across industrial land.

In a case where the river and boundary happen to be in more or less the same place, how do we know how the beoundary is defined?

(20 Feb '12, 11:15) SomeoneElse ♦
Your answer
toggle preview

Follow this question

By Email:

Once you sign in you will be able to subscribe for any updates here

By RSS:

Answers

Answers and Comments

Markdown Basics

  • *italic* or _italic_
  • **bold** or __bold__
  • link:[text](http://url.com/ "title")
  • image?![alt text](/path/img.jpg "title")
  • numbered list: 1. Foo 2. Bar
  • to add a line break simply add two spaces to where you would like the new line to be.
  • basic HTML tags are also supported

Question tags:

×140
×74

question asked: 18 Feb '12, 11:34

question was seen: 3,455 times

last updated: 20 Feb '12, 13:40

powered by OSQA